Raina, Heaven’s own civil servant, attempts diligently to record the events of creation while trying to stay detached from what is unfolding around her.

Part biblical interpretation, part cosmic steampunk fantasy, ‘The Record Keeper’ follows the story of Angels Cadan (the dutiful servant) and Larus (fallen, trying to reconcile his beliefs with God). Their friendship at stake, they recount the struggles they face to Raina, Heaven’s very own civil servant. Studious in her record keeping, she diligently records events while trying to stay detached from the destruction that unfolds around her.

Split into 11 parts, each detailing a particular dimension of the ensuing conflict, the mini stories merge seamlessly into each other, introducing some very memorable, interesting characters along the way. The steampunk aesthetics work well, with the supped-up Dickensian chic complimenting the otherworldly environment (amidst the technological leap incorporating what looks like teleportation, the civil service still use a gramophone to peer into, and amplify, the destruction of life). As soon as you see the look, you immediately say to yourself “Yes, I couldn’t have pictured Heaven’s municipal building better myself”.

Church enthusiasts and theologians may squirm, but the story is both compelling and an enlightening version of an age-old phenomena.

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Film and TV Now: The Record Keeper Review